Foam Cleaning

Foam is beneficial for cleaning large surface areas and can be used to clean transportation equipment exteriors, ceilings, walls, piping, belts, and storage containers. Portable foam equipment is similar in size and cost to portable high-pressure units. This cleaning method is popular in the meat and poultry industry primarily because less labor is involved.

Figure 2 A portable high-pressure, low-volume cleaning unit that can be used where a centralized system does not exist. This unit is equipped with racks for hoses, foamer, and cleaning compound storage and provides two rinse stations and a sanitizer unit. Two workers can simultaneously prerinse, clean, postrinse, and sanitize. This equipment can also apply foam if the spray wand is replaced with a foam wand accessory. (Courtesy of Ecolab, Inc., Mendota Heights, Minnesota.)

Figure 2 A portable high-pressure, low-volume cleaning unit that can be used where a centralized system does not exist. This unit is equipped with racks for hoses, foamer, and cleaning compound storage and provides two rinse stations and a sanitizer unit. Two workers can simultaneously prerinse, clean, postrinse, and sanitize. This equipment can also apply foam if the spray wand is replaced with a foam wand accessory. (Courtesy of Ecolab, Inc., Mendota Heights, Minnesota.)

C. Gel Cleaning

This equipment is similar to foam units, except that the cleaning compounds are applied as a gel. Gel is especially effective for cleaning packaging equipment because it clings to the surfaces and enhances soil removal. Equipment cost is similar to that of portable high-pressure or foam units.

D. Combination Centralized High-Pressure, Low-Volume, and Foam Cleaning

This equipment is similar to centralized high-pressure installations except that foam can also be applied to the equipment. This approach offers the most flexibility because foam can be used on large-surface areas, and high pressure can be applied to belts, conveyors, and difficult-to-reach areas in a meat or poultry plant.

E. Cleaning-in-Place (CIP)

This system incorporates a recirculating cleaning solution that is applied by installed nozzles, which automatically clean, rinse, and sanitize equipment. The use of CIP equipment in the meat and poultry industry is limited because it is expensive and lacks effectiveness in heavily soiled areas. This cleaning technique has some application in vacuum thawing

Figure 3 A centralized high-presure, low-volume system for a large cleaning operation. (Courtesy of Diversey Lever, Cincinnati, Ohio.)

chambers, pumping and brine circulation lines, preblend/batch silos, and edible and inedible fat-rendering systems.

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