Info

a Degrees Fahrenheit in excess of 60 °F multiplied by the time in hours, assuming temperature is constant.

a Degrees Fahrenheit in excess of 60 °F multiplied by the time in hours, assuming temperature is constant.

been implemented to assure safety of semidry (and dry) sausage products. Organisms such as E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes are cold-tolerant organisms that can survive fermentation. Consequently, additional requirements in the United States have been imposed by the USDA to assure safety in fermented sausage products. Processors are required to show that the process being used is effective for destruction of E. coli O157:H7. Validation of the process must demonstrate at least a 5-log (100,000) inactivation of the organism using USDA protocols. The most common means of achieving this is by heating. For example, USDA regulations include time-temperature combinations for heated products that will achieve E. coli inactivation such as 145°F (62.8 °C) for 4 min (8). Processors also have the option to hold and test finished products for E. coli O157:H7 contamination to show that the product is safe. A third alternative for assuring safety is to use a hazard analysis-critical control points (HACCP) program that includes testing of the raw product mixture and a minimum 2-log (100) kill. All of these process options for controlling E. coli O157:H7 must also be shown to be adequate to control trichina and salmonella. One concern for the heating process is that it can change the textural properties of finished products. Irradiation provides a viable alternative to the heat process for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and other pathogens in meat to be used for fermented sausage (9). A relatively low irradiation dose of 1.25 kGy is sufficient to provide a 5-log kill of E. coli O157:H7 (10). An advantage to irradiation is that meat is unaltered and retains raw characteristics in terms of color and texture. Semidry (and dry) sausage can be manufactured from irradiation-treated meat ingredients without the heating requirement for E. coli control. The resulting product characteristics, especially texture, more closely resemble that of traditional products (11). While irradiation has been approved in the United States for most fresh meat applications, approval of irradiation for finished processed products has not been finalized. Irradiation is fully capable of increasing shelf life and safety of finished semidry sausage products, but questions relating to product quality changes, requirements for packaging materials, and appropriate doses have precluded regulatory approval thus far.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Bread Making

Bread Making

Discover How To Surprise Family and Friends With Homemade Bread? Is Your Bread Coming Out Doughy Or Crumbly? Well, you don't have to be frustrated anymore by baking bread that doesnt rise all of the way or just doesn't have that special taste.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment