From Dried Malt Extract

Many home-brewers are now turning to the use of dried malt extract which is now on the market, and which is much more pleasant and convenient to handle than the sticky extract in jars.

It certainly makes an excellent brew, and readers may care to try these German recipes for its use.

It is important to use a good, sedimentary beer yeast, which will settle firmly and not rise throughout the wort, and it is best to make a starter for it a couple of days before you start brewing. These recipes are those advocated by the firm which supplies the Vierka XXXX beer yeast sold by Semplex.

In each of them, boil the dried malt and hops in the water for half an hour. Strain into two-gallon fermentation jar and fit an air lock.

Allow the liquor to cool to 70 degrees F. then add your yeast starter, and leave to ferment in a warm room for a week or eight days.

Siphon into a cask, jar with tap, or strong quart cider bottles. Make a priming syrup by dissolving 1 lb. of sugar in / pint of boiling water. To a 2-gallon container add 1 / oz. of this syrup, and to other containers and bottles proportionately, when siphoning the beer into them and this will impart a sparkle to the finished brew. With a cask or jar finings may be added at the same time. Bung down or cork securely, and after a fortnight to a month the beer will be ready to drink. Keeping it in a cool place will assist it to clear.

Here are the recipes:

Light Lager: 2 / lb. dried Malt Extract, 2 oz. hops, 2 gallons of water. Beer

Yeast.

Lager (Pilsener style): 4 / lb. dried Malt Extract, 1 oz. Hops, 2 gallons water, Beer Yeast.

Lager (Munich style): 5 lb. dried Malt Extract, / oz. of Caramel, 1 oz. Hops, 2 gallons water, Beer Yeast.

Dark Beer or Porter: 6 / lb. dried Malt Extract, 1 oz, of Caramel, 2 gallons water, Beer Yeast,

Ale: 6 / lb. dried Malt Extract, 2 gallons water, 2 oz. Hops, Beer Yeast.

Written by John Nott, cook to the Duke of Bolton in 1726

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