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Escherichia coli

Micrococcus luteus

Notes a, selective for 'wild yeast' but will support the growth of bacteria (and vice versa).

c, anaerobic incubation.

All microbiological analyses were in duplicate.

Where appropriate copper sulphate and cycloheximide were added to media at 45 to 47°C.

Notes a, selective for 'wild yeast' but will support the growth of bacteria (and vice versa).

c, anaerobic incubation.

All microbiological analyses were in duplicate.

Where appropriate copper sulphate and cycloheximide were added to media at 45 to 47°C.

occurs every six months. Although stored in liquid nitrogen, production yeasts are supplied 'in advance, in excess' to breweries on agar slopes. Strains are recovered from liquid nitrogen by rapid thawing and a 'master culture' prepared that is subject to testing as described above. The number of slopes of each strain that are prepared is determined by the requirements of the breweries together with a back-up of six slopes retained centrally in case of emergencies. To minimise complexity, more slopes than are necessarily required are supplied to breweries to meet unexpected demands of propagation. To enable traceability all slopes are labelled by strain, strain code, best-before date and individually, by number. To assure safe transport the slopes are labelled with a time temperature indicator that changes colour on exposure to temperatures > 37°C. Finally, to minimise risk, as well as meeting best practice, the entire slope is used in the first stage of laboratory propagation in the brewery.

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