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Reed and Nagodarithana (1991) gave the gross macromolecular composition of bakers' yeast as shown in Table 4.2. The same authors also provided a more detailed mineral composition of bakers' yeast and this is reproduced in Table 4.3, together with earlier data for brewers' yeast as given by Eddy (1958). Quite large differences may be observed in the concentrations of individual minerals between different yeast samples. Apart from the differences in growth conditions, alluded to already, it would be suspected that the materials of construction of the plant used for handling the yeast, particularly the fermenters in the case of the brewing types were influential.

The carbohydrate fraction of yeast includes structural components, especially those associated with the cell wall (see Section 4.4.2) and those with a storage and/or stress resistance function such as glycogen and trehalose (see Sections 3.4.2.1 and 3.4.2.2). Yeast lipids are mainly structural components of the plasma membrane and other

Table 4.2 Macromolecular composition of bakers' yeast (Reed & Nagodarithana, 1991).

Component Percentage

Table 4.2 Macromolecular composition of bakers' yeast (Reed & Nagodarithana, 1991).

Component Percentage

Moisture content

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