The Question Of Legality

This chapter is written specifically for readers who live in countries where it is presently illegal for amateurs to produce their own spirits by distillation. The rest can happily jump ahead to the chapters dealing with corn whiskey and how to make it. The conflict between governments and moonshiners has been going on for centuries and the reasons are not hard to find. From the government point of view, alcohol in one form or another is in such demand that it can be heavily taxed without fear...

Info

As mentioned in the section on the beer-stripper construction, it's important to use lead-free plumbing solder for constructing a still. Also, remember to use Teflon tape on all threaded connections to ensure a watertight seal. Simply wrap the Teflon tape around the male threads two or three times before inserting the connector into the female fitting. As shown in Figure 5, the apparatus consists of a boiler with a 114 cm 45 reflux column made from H copper pipe. At the top of the column is the...

Principles

Mashing is the biochemical process where starches are converted to sugars. Starches are long chains of sugar glucose molecules connected by ether linkages. An ether linkage is where two sugar molecules join together and one water molecule is removed. In mashing, enzymes cause water molecules to be reintroduced to the ether linkages, thereby breaking them and freeing the individual sugars from the chains. This process of breaking the ether linkages is called hydrolysis. The term starch refers to...

Equipment

Traditionally, whiskey is made in a gooseneck or a pot still. Pot stills are too rudimentary in design and do not afford sufficient separation of the mash compounds to make a good quality whiskey. For this reason, they are never recommended for the production of beverage alcohol anymore. Gooseneck or whiskey stills have been used for centuries for making whiskey and are used just as much today as they have ever been. Some of the world's finest whiskies are made in such stills, and some artisans...

Appendix A Other Mashing Methods

This section describes other mashing methods than the one given in the chapter on Mashing. The method described in the chapter on Mashing employs flaked maize, which is much easier to mash than undispersed forms of corn such as corn meal or corn flour. Undispersed grains require a full decoction i.e. boil to completely disperse their starches in the mash water, where flaked grains do not. Also discussed here, is the mashing of other cereal grains than corn. All flaked grains can be mashed the...

Pure Corn Whiskey

All alcoholic beverages are made by fermenting a sugar solution a.k.a. a fermentable substrate with yeast, a process that converts the sugar C6Hi2O6 to ethanol C2H5OH and carbon dioxide CO2 . Usually, one does not start with a pure sugar and water substrate, but with fruit juices for wine, mashed grains for whiskey, molasses for rum, and many others. Regardless of the sugar source the alcohol is the same. In addition to the variations imposed by the source of sugar, the yeasts themselves and...

Procedure

This section describes how to distill the 20L of strained corn mash from the chapter on Fermentation to produce about 2L of pure corn whiskey at 45 alc vol and about 920 ml of feints at 91 alc vol. The distillations will be carried out using the still or stills described in the chapter on Equipment. Transferring the Mash to the Still After the mash has been strained it can be transferred to the still. However, it's useful to cover the strained mash and allow it to settle for two or three hours....

Ingredients

Pure Corn whiskey is made from the simple and natural ingredients corn malt water and yeast. The mash should be composed of 80 to 90 corn with a 10 to 20 adjunct of malt to supply enzymes. Malt enzymes will be explained below and in the chapter on Mashing. Corn in most of its forms e.g. cornmeal, corn flour, flaked maize can be used to make whiskey. The corn must be top quality food-grade corn. Any attempts to use cow corn or chicken feed will only produce inferior results, possibly with...

Foreword

Making distilled spirits at home is as satisfying and rewarding as any hobby for those who live in countries where it is legal to do so. Homebrewers and winemakers would find it particularly interesting because it is a logical extension to their present hobbies. There are the same mashing and fermentation stages as in brewing, but instead of drinking the brew, it is subjected to a purification process. The process is distillation, a process as fascinating as mashing and fermentation are. This...

Chapter Page Number

4 The History of Corn Whiskey 11 The Fermenters Beer Stripper Optional 26 Corn Water Yeast Calcium sulphate CaSO4 95 Sulphuric Acid H2SO4 52 Calcium Carbonate CaCO3 53 7 Mashing Mash Water Measuring pH Adjusting pH Iodine Starch Test Equipment Ingredients 8 Fermentation Principles Grain Mash Fermentation 61