Figure

In order to use the tables at Figures 2, 3, and 4 as accurate guide-lines of the transition points for your spirit runs, it's necessary to map the quantities on the table you're using to your quantities. For example, Figure 3 shows a total volume of 95 alcohol of 1970 ml. Say the volume of 95 alcohol in a particular run of yours was 2050 ml. A mapping factor can be calculated by dividing your volume by the table's volume. That is, 2050 1970 1.04. At the bottom of Figure 3 is a table showing the...

Introduction

Numerous books have been written on homebrewing and home winemaking, and some have even been written on home distillation to produce pure ethanol for making gin vodka and essence-based spirits, but very few have been written on distillation for making whiskey on the small scale required by hobbyists. This book has been written in an attempt to rectify this situation, and to accommodate the recent advent of micro-distilleries and distillery pubs that are reintroducing the art of making corn...

Chapter Page Number

Fermentation Times 62 Specific Gravity (SG) 62 Calculating Alcohol Content 64 Straining the Mash Procedure Ingredients Equipment Method 9 Distillation Principles Whiskey Distillation 71 Foreshots Middle-run Feints Canadian Style Kentucky Style Tennessee Style Procedure Transferring the Mash to the Still 75 Transferring the Low-wines to the Still 75 Measuring Alcohol Content 76 Method Beer Stripping (Optional) 76 Spirit-Run Flow Rate Blending Mashing Fermentation Beer-Stripping Distillation...

Mashing

Prepare 23L of pH 5.8 mash water in a large pot on a stove. 3. Monitor the temperature until it's 74oC (165 F). 4. Turn off the heat, and stir in 7L of flaked maize. 5. Stir the mash until the starches disperse, and the temperature drops to 66.5oC (152oF). 6. Stir in 1 L of crushed barley malt and 5-ml (1-tsp) of gluco-amylase. 7. Cover and leave for 90 minutes or longer.

Info

45L (12 US gallon) electric hot water heater 3000W, 240V water heater element copper or brass male adapter (male thread to female sweat) x H copper coupling (only one is required if you are using a H cork 3 plumbing to garden-hose adapters humidifier tap-valve kit (1 saddle valve and 8M (25') 3 16 plastic tubing) laboratory thermometer (0o-110 o C (32 o -230 o F)) H cork (or wine-bottle cork) copper or stainless steel scouring pads 90o electrical box connector 120 V 3-prong plug heavy-duty...

Beerstripping Distillation Optional

Transfer the fermented and strained corn mash to the beer stripper. 22. Start running cold water through the condenser. 23. Turn on the electric current. 24. Place a suitably sized receiver under the output of the beer stripper. 25. Collect the low wines until the still-head temperature reaches 98oC (208.4oF) or so (approximately 4 hours from when the electric current is switched on).

The History Of Corn Whiskey

This chapter, which chronicles the evolution of corn whiskey, is summarized from Joseph E. Dabney's authoritative book on the Appalachian moonshine culture, Mountain Spirits1. Mountain Spirits is highly recommended reading if you are interested in a more detailed history of corn whiskey. To appreciate the roots of American whiskey distilling, which was born in the Appalachian frontier in the 1700s and 1800s, we must trace back to our Scottish, Irish, French, German, and English ancestors who...

The Question Of Legality

This chapter is written specifically for readers who live in countries where it is presently illegal for amateurs to produce their own spirits by distillation. The rest can happily jump ahead to the chapters dealing with corn whiskey and how to make it. The conflict between governments and moonshiners has been going on for centuries and the reasons are not hard to find. From the government point of view, alcohol in one form or another is in such demand that it can be heavily taxed without fear...

Spiritrun

Add 500-ml of feints to the fermented mash, or the low wines from the beer-stripping run. 27. Transfer the fermented mash, or the low wines to the spirit still. 28. Ensure spirit still contains at least 8L. Top up with water if necessary. 30. Calculate the volume of 95 alc vol in the still and enter it into a table like the one at Appendix C. 31. Map the table 2, 3, or 4 volumes to your volumes and enter them in your table. 32. Start running cold water through the heat exchanger. 33. Ensure...

Principles

Mashing is the biochemical process where starches are converted to sugars. Starches are long chains of sugar glucose molecules connected by ether linkages. An ether linkage is where two sugar molecules join together and one water molecule is removed. In mashing, enzymes cause water molecules to be reintroduced to the ether linkages, thereby breaking them and freeing the individual sugars from the chains. This process of breaking the ether linkages is called hydrolysis. The term starch refers to...

Equipment

Traditionally, whiskey is made in a gooseneck or a pot still. Pot stills are too rudimentary in design and do not afford sufficient separation of the mash compounds to make a good quality whiskey. For this reason, they are never recommended for the production of beverage alcohol anymore. Gooseneck or whiskey stills have been used for centuries for making whiskey and are used just as much today as they have ever been. Some of the world's finest whiskies are made in such stills, and some artisans...

Appendix A Other Mashing Methods

This section describes other mashing methods than the one given in the chapter on Mashing. The method described in the chapter on Mashing employs flaked maize, which is much easier to mash than undispersed forms of corn such as corn meal or corn flour. Undispersed grains require a full decoction i.e. boil to completely disperse their starches in the mash water, where flaked grains do not. Also discussed here, is the mashing of other cereal grains than corn. All flaked grains can be mashed the...

Pure Corn Whiskey

All alcoholic beverages are made by fermenting a sugar solution a.k.a. a fermentable substrate with yeast, a process that converts the sugar C6Hi2O6 to ethanol C2H5OH and carbon dioxide CO2 . Usually, one does not start with a pure sugar and water substrate, but with fruit juices for wine, mashed grains for whiskey, molasses for rum, and many others. Regardless of the sugar source the alcohol is the same. In addition to the variations imposed by the source of sugar, the yeasts themselves and...

Procedure

This section describes how to distill the 20L of strained corn mash from the chapter on Fermentation to produce about 2L of pure corn whiskey at 45 alc vol and about 920 ml of feints at 91 alc vol. The distillations will be carried out using the still or stills described in the chapter on Equipment. Transferring the Mash to the Still After the mash has been strained it can be transferred to the still. However, it's useful to cover the strained mash and allow it to settle for two or three hours....

Ingredients

Pure Corn whiskey is made from the simple and natural ingredients corn malt water and yeast. The mash should be composed of 80 to 90 corn with a 10 to 20 adjunct of malt to supply enzymes. Malt enzymes will be explained below and in the chapter on Mashing. Corn in most of its forms e.g. cornmeal, corn flour, flaked maize can be used to make whiskey. The corn must be top quality food-grade corn. Any attempts to use cow corn or chicken feed will only produce inferior results, possibly with...

Foreword

Making distilled spirits at home is as satisfying and rewarding as any hobby for those who live in countries where it is legal to do so. Homebrewers and winemakers would find it particularly interesting because it is a logical extension to their present hobbies. There are the same mashing and fermentation stages as in brewing, but instead of drinking the brew, it is subjected to a purification process. The process is distillation, a process as fascinating as mashing and fermentation are. This...