Foods made from tempeh

Soybean tempeh can be sold fresh, refrigerated (Fig. 5), frozen or even distributed in cans. This fermented product is remarkably versatile and can be served in hundreds of different Western or Asian-style recipes, such as tempeh burgers and sushi (Fig. 6); tempeh, lettuce and tomato sandwiches; tempeh chops topped with apple sauce; crisp slices or cubes added to salads, soups, pizza toppings, stir-fried rice, casseroles, sauces or tacos. The most popular and simplest way of serving is shallow-fried or deep-fried tempeh (Shurtleff & Aoyagi, 2001). Tempeh has also been processed into powder and used as an additive to infant weaning food

(Egounlety et al, 2002), ice-cream (JuQin et al, 2001), biscuit (Matsuo, 2006) or ready-to-prepare food mixes (Vaidehi et al., 1996). In China, soybean tempeh is milled and mixed with meat to make sausages in order to reduce the use of meat, but still maintain the protein quality (Jujin et al., 2000). Several dishes have also been prepared from barley tempeh (Fig. 7).

Meat Fermentation Process
Fig. 3. Production processes of soybean tempeh (modified from Hachmeister & Fung, 1993; Nout & Kiers, 2005 ) and barley tempeh (modified from Berg et al., 2001; I).
Fermenation ProcessThe Process Alcoholic Fermentation

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Fig. 4. Comparison of pH values and microbial growth in barley tempeh (a, data from I) and soybean tempeh (b, data from Ashenafi, 1991); pH values of barley or soybean tempeh fermented by R. oligosporus alone (♦), or together with Lactobacillus plantarum (in barley tempeh) or together with L. plantarum and Listeria monocytogenes (in soybean tempeh) (□); and the growth (log cfu) of L. plantarum (▲) and L. monocytogenes (o).

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Fig. 4. Comparison of pH values and microbial growth in barley tempeh (a, data from I) and soybean tempeh (b, data from Ashenafi, 1991); pH values of barley or soybean tempeh fermented by R. oligosporus alone (♦), or together with Lactobacillus plantarum (in barley tempeh) or together with L. plantarum and Listeria monocytogenes (in soybean tempeh) (□); and the growth (log cfu) of L. plantarum (▲) and L. monocytogenes (o).

The Process Alcoholic FermentationTempeh Fermentation Process
Fig. 7. Barley tempeh dishes (Photo: Olligon AB).
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