Indirect Heating

An indirectly heated boiler is supplied with heat that is generated elsewhere, and then transferred to the boiler in a well-controlled manner. Frequently, the laws of physics control the temperature and the rate of heat transfer (for example, you cannot provide more than 100°C with hot water. This prevents burning in cooking, and is particularly suitable for processing botanicals or thick mashes, which might be ruined by higher temperatures). The two main methods of indirect heating are jackets and coils.

The Bath or Jacket

The Bath or Jacket

Home Distillation

The boiler is held inside another container that holds heated liquid or steam. The arrangement can be two separate pots (like a double boiler), or a shroud or channel permanently mounted to the outside of the boiler. The jacket can be directly heated itself (again, like the common double boiler), or fed with hot liquid or steam from a separate boiler. Jacketed heating vessels are very common in industry.

Indirect heating

Indirect heating

Exposed Coil Vessels

A coil of tubing is mounted inside the boiler, in direct contact with the liquid. Hot liquid or steam flows through the coil, heating the boiler's contents. This arrangement requires a separate heat source, and is also common in industry. This is equivalent to an immersion element, but the rate of heat transfer and the highest temperature the boiler's contents are exposed to tend to be lower.

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