C

FIG. 14-23 Common downcomer types. (a) Segmental. (b) Circular. (c, d) Sloped. (From Henry Z. Kister, Chem. Eng., December 29, 1980; reprinted courtesy of Chemical Engineering.)

FIG. 14-23 Common downcomer types. (a) Segmental. (b) Circular. (c, d) Sloped. (From Henry Z. Kister, Chem. Eng., December 29, 1980; reprinted courtesy of Chemical Engineering.)

FIG. 14-24 Antijump baffle. (Reprinted courtesy of Koch-Glitsch LP.)

FIG. 14-25 A common design practice of ensuring a positive downcomer seal. (From Henry Z. Kister, Chem. Eng., December 29, 1980; reprinted courtesy of Chemical Engineering.)

areas bring about a capacity reduction when limited by entrainment or downcomer backup flood or by excessive pressure drop. At above 12 percent of the bubbling areas, the capacity gains from higher hole areas become marginal while weeping and, at high liquid loads also channeling, escalate.

Typical open-slot areas for moving valve trays are 14 to 15 percent of the bubbling area. Here the higher hole areas can be afforded due to the high turndown of the valves.

Moving valves can have a sharp or a smooth ("venturi") orifice. The venturi valves have one-half the dry pressure drop of the sharp-orifice valves, but are far more prone to weeping and channeling than the sharp-orifice valves. Sharp orifices are almost always preferred.

Multipass Balancing There are two balancing philosophies: equal bubbling areas and equal flow path lengths. Equal bubbling areas means that all active area panels on Fig. l4-21d are of the same area, and each panel has the same hole (or open-slot) area. In a four-pass tray, one-quarter of the gas flows through each panel. To equalize the L/G ratio on each panel, the liquid needs to be split equally to each panel. Since the center weirs are longer than the side weirs, more liquid tends to flow toward the center weir. To equalize, side weirs are often swept back (Fig. 14-22b) while center weirs often contain picket fences (Fig. 14-22c).

The alternative philosophy (equal flow path lengths) provides more bubbling and perforation areas in the central panels of Fig. 14-21d and less in the side panels. To equalize the L/G ratio, less liquid needs to flow toward the sides, which is readily achieved, as the center weirs are naturally longer than the side weirs. Usually there is no need for swept-back weirs, and only minimal picket-fencing is required at the center weir.

Equal flow path panels are easier to fabricate and are cheaper, while equal bubbling areas have a robustness and reliability advantage due to the ease of equally splitting the fluids. The author had good experience with both when well-designed. Pass balancing is discussed in detail by Pilling [Chem. Eng. Prog., p. 22 (June 2005)] and by Jaguste and Kelkar [Hydroc. Proc., p. 85 (March 2006)].

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