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2C>pUg

FIG. 14-115 Experimental collection efficiencies of rectangular impactors. C is the Stokes-Cunningham correction factor; pp, particle density, g/cm3; Ug, superficial gas velocity, approaching the impactor openings, cm/s; and ^g, gas viscosity, P. [Calvert, Yung, and Leung, NTIS Publ. PB-248050; based on Mercer and Chow, J. Coll. Interface Sci., 27, 75 (1968).]

FIG. 14-116 Experimental results showing effect of gas velocity and liquid load on entrainment from (a) vertical tube banks with horizontal gas flow and (b) horizontal tube banks with upflow. To convert meters per second to feet per second, multiply by 3.281. (Calvert, Yung, and Leung, NTIS Publ. PB-248050.)

Gas velocity, m/s

FIG. 14-116 Experimental results showing effect of gas velocity and liquid load on entrainment from (a) vertical tube banks with horizontal gas flow and (b) horizontal tube banks with upflow. To convert meters per second to feet per second, multiply by 3.281. (Calvert, Yung, and Leung, NTIS Publ. PB-248050.)

The onset of liquid reentrainment from tube banks can be predicted from Fig. 14-116. Reentrainment occurred at much lower velocities in vertical upflow than in horizontal gas flow through vertical tube banks. While the top of the cross-hatched line of Fig. 14-116a predicts reentrainment above gas velocities of 3 m/s (9.8 ft/s) at high liquid loading, most of the entrainment settled to the bottom of the duct in 1 to 2 m (3.3 to 6.6 ft), and entrainment did not carry significant distances until the gas velocity exceeded 7 m/s (23 ft/s).

Packed-Bed Collectors Many different materials, including coal, coke, broken solids of various types such as brick, tile, rock, and stone, as well as normal types of tower-packing rings, saddles, and special plastic shapes, have been used over the years in packed beds to remove entrained liquids through impaction and filtration. Separators using natural materials are not available as standard commercial units but are designed for specific applications. Coke boxes were used extensively in the years 1920 to 1940 as sulfuric acid entrainment separators (see Chemical Engineers' Handbook, 5th ed., p. 18-87) but have now been largely superseded by more sophisticated and efficient devices.

Jackson and Calvert [Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. J., 12, 1075 (1966)] studied the collection of fine fuel-oil-mist particles in beds of a-in glass spheres, Raschig rings, and Berl and Intalox saddles. The mist had a mass median particle diameter of 6 |m and a standard deviation of 2.0. The collection efficiency as a function of particle size and gas velocity in a 355-mm- (14-in-) diameter by 152-mm- (6-in-) thick bed of Intalox saddles is given in Fig. 14-117. This and additional work have been generalized by Calvert (R-12) to predict collection efficiencies of liquid particles in any packed bed. Assumptions in the theoretical development are that the drag force on the drop is given by Stokes' law and that the number of semicircular bends to which the gas is subjected, %, is related to the length of the bed, Z (cm), in the direction of gas flow, the packing diameter, dc (cm), and the gas-flow channel width, b (cm), such that % = Z/(dc + b). The gas velocity through the channels, Ugb (cm/s), is inversely proportional to the bed free volume for gas flow such that Ugb = Ug [1/(e — hb)], where Ug is the gas superficial velocity, cm/s, approaching the bed, £ is the bed void fraction, and hb is the fraction of the total bed volume taken up with liquid which can be obtained from data on liquid holdup in packed beds. The width of the semicircular channels b can be expressed as a fraction j of the diameter of the packing elements, such that b = jdc. These assumptions (as modified by G. E. Goltz, personal communica-

FIG. 14-117 Experimental collection efficiency. 1/2-in Intalox saddles. To convert feet per second to meters per second, multiply by 0.3048; to convert centimeters to inches, multiply by 0.394; and to convert grams per cubic centimeter to pounds per cubic foot, multiply by 62.43. Jackson and Calvert, Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. J., 12,1975 (1968).]

FIG. 14-117 Experimental collection efficiency. 1/2-in Intalox saddles. To convert feet per second to meters per second, multiply by 0.3048; to convert centimeters to inches, multiply by 0.394; and to convert grams per cubic centimeter to pounds per cubic foot, multiply by 62.43. Jackson and Calvert, Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. J., 12,1975 (1968).]

TABLE 14-27 Experimental Values for j, Channel Width in Packing as a Fraction of Packing Diameter

Packing

size

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