Secondgeneration Random Packings

Intalox® saddles (Fig. 8.2a). Developed by the Norton Company, they superseded the Berl saddles. The shape of the Berl saddle was modified in the Intalox® so that adjacent elements do not blank off any sig-

Flgure 8.1 First-generation random packings, (a) Raschig ring, metal; (¿>) Lessing ring, metal; (c) Berl saddle, ceramic.

Lessing Rings

Flgure 8.1 First-generation random packings, (a) Raschig ring, metal; (¿>) Lessing ring, metal; (c) Berl saddle, ceramic.

(a) Raschig Ring

( b) Lessing Ring

(c 1 Berl Saddle

(a) Raschig Ring

( b) Lessing Ring

(c 1 Berl Saddle

Raschig Rings

Figure 8.2 (Continued) Second-generation random packings, (c) Super Intalox* saddle, plastic; (d) Pall® ring, metal. (Courtesy of Norton Company.)

nificant portion of the wetting liquid, thus avoiding stagnant pools of liquid, trapping of ga$ bubbles, and violent changes in the direction of the gas. These factors result in a higher capacity, higher efficiency, and lower pressure drop than Berl saddles.

Intalox® saddles are available in ceramic only from the Norton Company. Packings that are normally considered equivalent to the Intalox® saddles are marketed under the trade names of Flexisaddle® by Koch Engineering Company, Inc.; and Novalox® saddles by Jaeger

Koch Tower Packing
Figure 8.2 [Continued) Second-generation random packings, (e) Pall* ring, plastic; (/) Hy-Pak® ring, metal. (Courtesy of Norton Company.)

Products, Inc. Rauschert Industries, Inc., also markets a packing similar to the Intalox® saddles.

Super Intalox® Tower Packing (Fig, 8.2 b,c). This packing was developed by the Norton Company. The smooth edges of the Intalox* saddle were scalloped in the Super Intalox® and holes were inserted. These changes promote drainage of liquid, eliminate stagnant pockets, and provide more open area for vapor rise. The Super Intalox® was shown (2) to have higher capacity and higher efficiency compared to the Intalox® saddle.

Super Intalox® saddles are available in ceramic and plastic from the Norton Company. Plastic packings that are normally considered equivalent to the Super Intalox® are marketed under the trade names of Flexisaddle® by Koch Engineering Company, Inc.; Ballast*® saddles by Glitsch Inc.; and Novalox® saddles by Jaeger Products, Inc.

Pall® rings (Fig. 8.2d,e). BASF developed the Pall® ring by cutting windows in the Raschig ring and bending the window tongues inward. This opened up the ring, lowered its friction, and improved packing area distribution, wetting, and distribution of liquid. Pall® rings ham higher capacity and efficiency and lower pressure drop than the packings described so far. Pall® rings are available in metal and plastic and are marketed by the Norton Company; Jaeger Products, Inc.; and by Rauschert Industries, Inc. Packings that sure normally considered equivalent to the Pall® rings are marketed under the trade names of Flexiring® by Koch Engineering Company, Inc., and Ballast® ring by Glitsch, Inc.

A ceramic Pall® ring is also available and is marketed by Jaeger Products, Inc., and Rauschert Industries, Inc. The ceramic Pall® ring has not been popular, and tests by Billet (3) show that its performance is inferior to that of the ceramic Intalox® saddle.

Hy-Pak® Tower Packing (Fig. 8.2f). Similar to the Pall® ring, Hy-Pak® has more internal tongues in an effort to improve the spread of surface area. The resulting claimed efficiency improvement was traded off for greater capacity by making the ring slightly larger than the equivalent Pall® ring (4). Compared to the Pall® ring, Hy-Pak® has been shown to give better capacity at an equivalent efficiency (4).

Hy-Pak® is available in metals only and is marketed by the Norton Company. Packings that are normally considered equivalent to Hy-Pak® are marketed under the trade names of K-PAC® by Koch Engineering Co., Inc., and Ballast-plus® by Glitsch, Inc.

0 0

Post a comment