Types of Wire Mesh Structured Packing

Sulzer® Wire Gauze Packing. This is a fabric (Fig. 8.8a and b) woven from fine-diameter wire. The packing elements consist of parallel, perforated, corrugated sheets of wire mesh. The corrugations are inclined with respect to the tower axis, and the direction of the corrugations is reversed on adjacent strips. Packing sections, which are about 7 in tall, are stacked in the shell to the required height. Adjacent sections are rotated by 90°. Three types of Sulzer® Wire Gauze packing are available: AX, BX, and CY. The BX type (Fig. 8.8a), by far the most common KS packing, has a mesh surface area of 150 ft2/ft3, a 0.35-in crimp side length, and a 60° angle of orientation to the horizontal. The CY type (Fig. 8.86) has a mesh surface area of 200 ft2/ft3, a 0.25-in crimp side length, and a 45° angle of orientation to the horizontal (19).

Hyperfil Knit Mesh
Figure 8.8 Wire-mesh structured packings, (a) Sulzer® wire gauze packing BX; (b) Sulzer* wire gauze packing CY. (Paris a and b, courtesy of Sulzer Chemtech.)

The Sulzer® Wire Gauze packing is available most commonly in 316 stainless steel, but also in other corrosion-resistant metals. A similar wire mesh is available in ceramics and plastics. The packing is marketed in the United States by Koch Engineering Company, Inc., and worldwide by Sulzer Chemtech. Packings that are often considered equivalent to the Sulzer® Wire Gauze BX packing are marketed by Glitsch Inc. under the trade name Gempak® 4BG, by the Norton Com-

Gempak Packing

Figure 8.8 (Continued) Wire-mesh structured packings, (c) Goodloe®; (d) Monte A3-500®. (Pari c, courtesy of Glitsch, Inc.; part d, courtesy of Nutter Engineering Corp.)

Figure 8.8 (Continued) Wire-mesh structured packings, (c) Goodloe®; (d) Monte A3-500®. (Pari c, courtesy of Glitsch, Inc.; part d, courtesy of Nutter Engineering Corp.)

pany under the trade name Intalox® High-Performance Wire Gauze Packing, and by ACS under the title ST-100.

Goodloe® (Fig. 8.8c). This is a fabric made of a multifilament of fine-diameter wires. The wires arfe knitted together to form a tube, which is flattened into a ribbon, crimped, and plied. Two ribbons (one turned over so that their crimps cross each other) are then rolled together to form a cylindrical cartridge having enough layers to fit the column snugly. With larger column diameters, layering in segments is used instead of rolling. Goodloe® has a specific surface area of about 585 ft2/ft3 but variations of up to 1000 ft2/ft3 are also available (20). Goodloe® is available most commonly in 316 stainless steel, but also in carbon steel, aluminum, alloys, plastic, Kynar, and Teflon. Goodloe® is available from Glitsch Inc. and from ACS.

Hyperfil®. Like Goodloe®, Hyperfil® is a fabric made of a multifilament of fine-diameter wire. The wires knitted to form a tube, which is flattened into a ribbon, crimped, and plied. Unlike Goodloe®, a cartridge or a segment of a cartridge is then formed by folding the ribbon in parallel vertical layers, rather than rolling it into a spiral. The specific surface area of Hyperfil® is comparable to Goodloe®. Hyperfil® is available in stainless steel, copper, and corrosion-resist-ant alloys from ACS.

Monte A® (Fig. 8.8cf). This packing is made of perforated wire mesh sheets, similar to the Sulzer® Wire Gauze Packing. The wire mesh sheets, however, are corrugated in a special contoured pattern and are arranged vertically. Adjacent sections are rotated at 90°. The Montz A3® supersedes earlier products, Montz A2® and Montz Al®. The surface area per unit volume of Montz A3® is 150 ft2/ft3, the same as that of the Sulzer® Wire Gauze BX packing. Montz A3® is available in stainless steel and other corrosion-resistant alloys from Nutter Engineering Corporation.

Was this article helpful?

+2 -2

Post a comment